Academia Semillas del Pueblo

    4736 Huntington Dr., Los Angeles, 90032

    charter

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    ENROLLMENT

    336

    STUDENT-TEACHER RATIO ?

    22:1

    UNOFFICIAL API RANK ?

    1/10

    DIVERSITY RANK ?

    1/10

    Student body

    Student body ethnicity ?
    • Enrollment: 336 students
    • Free and reduced-price lunch: 84.7% ?
    • English language learners: 16.4%
    • Diversity rank: 1/10 ?
    Source: 2012-13 state data

    Faculty

    • Total teachers: 15
    • Student-teacher ratio: 22:1 ?
    Source: 2012-13 state data

    Performance

    Academic Performance Index (API) ?
    Unofficial Rank: 1/10 ?
    Source: 2008-2013 state data
    California Standards Tests (STAR) ?
    Students scoring "proficient" or above:

    2013

    2012

    2011

    2010

    2009

    No Child Left Behind (AYP) ?
    Fail: Missed five of 17 federal targets for 2012

    Fail: Missed nine of 17 federal targets for 2011

    Fail: Missed three of 17 federal targets for 2010

    Fail: Missed eight of 17 federal targets for 2009

    Fail: Missed one of 17 federal targets for 2008

    Fail: Missed four of 17 federal targets for 2007

    Nearby schools

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      Six comments about Academia Semillas del Pueblo

      Hello there as a mother of a toddler , looking for a "good" school and proper education for ones child can be nerve wrecking. When i came across Semillas Del Pueblo i become intrigued and found myself researching about the school, the teachers, the curriculum not only have i made my decision about the school that my son will one day attend but i have found myself excited about a school that teaches culture and holds its ground dispute all the fuss people seem to make !
      simpre vianey *

      — vianey
      July 17, 2010 at 10:43 p.m.

      This school is great. They teach Well and they are improving greatly. look last year maybe was a little off but they were starting a high sschool program of course it would be a little rocky but it really is a good school. i think people who say nasty comments about our school are completly rude and idiodic
      -Student

      — Katie
      March 31, 2010 at 3:17 p.m.

      Praise the school - denigrate a founder? If the main thing critics can criticize about Semillas these days is me, then we definitely are ahead of the curve. I am very pleased to report that while the LA Times' charts may seem to depict poor performance, our school is excelling.

      As our parents already know, our school has made tremendous progress as measured by California's standardized tests thanks to the good work of our school community. By organizing teacher dedication, student integrity, parent support and strategic planning from our school leadership, our school has again surpassed all expectations by raising our Academic Performance Index by 76 points overall to 696. We also met all sub-group benchmarks. These student sub-groups include: Latino, Socio-economically Disadvantaged, and English Learners. Our scores improved drastically in each of these sub-groups, far surpassing the state's targets. As such, our school met ALL of the state's growth targets for ALL of our school's student sub-groups. The most improved being the Socio-economically Disadvantaged student sub-group, which improved by 91 POINTS. This is a tremendous success by any measure, but in light of the fact that we continue to offer a rich cultural curriculum, and a powerful international educational program. We remain dedicated to cultivating higher learning.

      As our parents also know, our students study in a type of dual immersion language instructional model. This means that from Kinder through at least the third grade but up to the eighth grade, our students study from half to almost ninety percent of the day in SPANISH. We have demonstrated amazingly positive results with our students' growth over time in the English language arts. In 2005-2006, our school was expected to meet 24.4% proficiency in the area of English language arts school-wide and in the three sub-groups mentioned above. In 2007-2008, our students exceeded the benchmark of 24.4% proficiency in all groups except English Language Learners. For example, where as in 2005-2006 only 14% of our students school wide achieved proficiency in the English Language Arts, by 2007-2008, 29.9% of our students achieved proficiency, and 48% of our students grades 6-8 met proficiency far surpassing the state's NEW target of 34.4% proficiency. Given more time, our students surpass both state and federal goals.

      Additionally, since 2005, our API score has risen 119 points, well over the 30-point combined growth targets the state has set for our school over the last three years. This is a significant accomplishment, but even more remarkable when we consider that students who were in the third through fifth grades in our school in 2005-2006, achieved a disaggregated API score of 784 this year, far surpassing all surrounding middle schools in 2008.

      — Marcos Aguilar, Executive Director
      October 23, 2008 at 3:35 p.m.

      In some ways this school is ahead of the curve, teaching Mandarin and Nahuatl for example. The future of the world's economy lies in the Pacific Rim and Mandarin is good to know. Nahuatl is a culturally relevant alternative to teaching Latin or Greek, which is great. For the critics, wealthy private schools on the westside teach 2-3 languages to their students, so there should be no problem teaching kids multiple languages. The main problem with this school is the oligarch that runs it. Unfortunately, it is more about not putting his kids in public schools than actually serving the community. He is horrible about parental input if you have a different perspective than his. However, what is most repulsive is his pimping of Indigenous culture, while acting like he cares about community. It is really all about Marcos, not about communidad.

      — Reynaldo
      September 18, 2008 at 10:57 a.m.

      If we closed every school in LAUSD for them not meeting goals then we would not have any left. I really think charter schools offer a different approach for students that otherwise would be lost in a bigger problematic school. A reform across the board would be great , maybe even breaking the troubled district.

      — David
      September 9, 2008 at 12:53 p.m.

      Why is a charter school, that receives special funding, failing it's own students? Where are the audits to address the problem or close the school.

      — Jeff
      September 4, 2008 at 12:03 p.m.

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      California Schools Guide is the Los Angeles Times' database of test scores, demographics and reader comments about California's public, charter and private schools.
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